Shiba Inu

The shiba inu is reasonably compact, being marginally more than it is tall. It’s typical traits of puppies from Northern background: small erect ears, thick fur, strong body and curly tail. Its expression is daring, lively and good-natured. The gait is light, fast and nimble, with a simple, smooth stride. The double coat is made up of solid straight outer coat with a soft undercoat, imparting great insulation. These traits allowed the shiba to hunt small game via dense cover.

Bold, independent and headstrong, the shiba is filled up with self-confidence. It’s lively outside, yet calm inside, so long as it becomes daily exercise. It might be aggressive with strange dogs of the exact same gender and might chase tiny animals. It’s a hardy breed, prepared for adventure. Some are to be headstrong and domineering. It’s territorial, awake and reserved for strangers — components making for an superb watchdog. It’s fairly outspoken; a few bark a whole lot.

AKC RANKING 62
FAMILY spitz, Northern (companion)
AREA OF ORIGIN Japan
DATE OF ORIGIN ancient times
ORIGINAL FUNCTION hunting and flushing small game
TODAY’S FUNCTION companion
AVERAGE SIZE OF MALE Height: 14.5-16.5 Weight: 23
AVERAGE SIZE OF FEMALE Height: 13.5-15.5 Weight: 17
OTHER NAME brushwood dog, Japanese small-size dog

The shiba inu is reasonably compact, being marginally more than it is tall. It’s typical traits of puppies from Northern background: small erect ears, thick fur, strong body and curly tail. Its expression is daring, lively and good-natured. The gait is light, fast and nimble, with a simple, smooth stride. The double coat is made up of solid straight outer coat with a soft undercoat, imparting great insulation. These traits allowed the shiba to hunt small game via dense cover.

Bold, independent and headstrong, the shiba is filled up with self-confidence. It’s lively outside, yet calm inside, so long as it becomes daily exercise. It might be aggressive with strange dogs of the exact same gender and might chase modest animals. It’s a hardy breed, prepared for adventure. Some are to be headstrong and domineering. It’s territorial, awake and reserved for strangers — components making for an superb watchdog. It’s fairly outspoken; a few bark a whole lot.

  • Energy levelMedium energy
  • Exercise needsMedium
  • PlayfullnessModerately playful
  • Affection levelModerately affectionate
  • Friendliness toward other dogsShy
  • Friendliness toward other petsShy
  • Friendliness toward strangersFriendly
  • Ease of trainingEasy to train
  • Watchdog abilityHigh
  • Protection abilityModerately protective
  • Grooming needsModerate maintenance
  • Cold toleranceHigh tolerance
  • Heat toleranceLow tolerance
• Major concerns: none
• Minor concerns: patellar luxation
• Occasionally seen: none
• Suggested tests: knee
• Life span: 12 – 15 years
Native Japanese puppies are broken up into six strains. Of them, the smallest and likely most historical is that the shiba inu. In reality, 1 theory about the title shiba is the fact that it merely denotes smallnonetheless, it might also mean brushwood with regard to the vivid reddish brushwood trees which so closely matched the breed’s reddish coat and via which they searched. These concepts have caused the shiba ‘s being nicknamed the “small brushwood dog.” The source of this shiba is cloudy; but it’s obviously of spitz legacy and might have been used as early as 300 B.C. as a hunting dog in central Japan. Though they had been used mainly to flush birds and small game, they have been sometimes utilized to hunt wild boar. Three major types existed and every was named because of its region of origin: the Shinshu shiba (“in the Nagano Prefecture”), the Mino shiba (“in the Gifu Prefecture”), along with also the Sanin shiba (“in the northeast mainland”). Following World War II, the strain was almost dropped, and it was further afield by distemper at 1952. In an effort to conserve the shiba inu, the various kinds were interbred, crossing the heavier-boned puppies from mountainous areas with the lighter-boned puppies from different regions. Because of this, the shiba endured as a single strain, with some variation in bone material. The very first shiba came to America in 1954 and has been formally recognized by the AKC in 1993. Ever since that time, shibas have attained a staunch after, and their popularity keeps growing.

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